Is Relational Understanding and Instrumental Knowledge of Mathematics a Continuum or a Dichotomy?

Posted by on May 23, 2016 in KK | No Comments

Is Relational Understanding and Instrumental Knowledge of Mathematics a Continuum or a Dichotomy? You are in a classroom listening to your mathematics teacher going through a maths problem. Without using any mathematical jargon nor formulae the teacher tackles the problem using real life examples and experiences, and you are convinced that you have understood all […]

Play Hard, Learn Harder

Posted by on Apr 5, 2016 in KK | 2 Comments

It is true that becoming hooked to a video game depends on how the game challenges one’s mind and stimulates their desire to get to the next level. Apart from the theme of the game itself, some of the main selling aspects of a video game is its graphics and motion abilities. If the graphics depict real life […]

Grit and a Mindset Revolution

Posted by on Mar 1, 2016 in KK | One Comment

After watching Angela Duckworth’s Ted Talk I tried to think of how a teacher could communicate to students the fact that, with effort and grit, everyone’s brain is capable of growing and that ‘smartness’ can be learned (Carol Dweck, 2006). One suggestion would be to allow teachers to show their classes a scientific demonstration of […]

MEMORISING AIN’T MY CUP OF TEA

Posted by on Feb 15, 2016 in KK | 3 Comments

Knowledge, practice and NOT talent makes perfect! It is also true that no one is born with a talent to ride a bike. We all have to learn to do something. It’s how we nurture such acquired knowledge that defines our performance, not talent. We can all agree that an ideal learning environment should prioritise […]

Are Maths Teachers Disciples of Doom?

Posted by on Feb 2, 2016 in KK, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

A lot has been written about how students find mathematics dull and boring, how irrelevant and ambiguous the subject can be, but no one has ever elaborated as clearly the reasons behind this hatred of the subject than Paul Lockhart’s paper on the current system of teaching mathematics. Now, I understand clearly why so many […]

It’s an Obsession

Posted by on Jan 7, 2016 in KK | One Comment

If the presence of technology in a classroom enhances learning and improves all students’ interaction with the subject then it is a good thing, and that piece of technology should be promoted. But if technology takes away the essence of learning per se, then I bet to differ. A parent sends her child to school […]

Shanghai Maths Experience

Posted by on Dec 9, 2015 in KK | No Comments

Shanghai Maths Teaching Experience It was an honour to be invited to the Shanghai Maths seminar at Chailey a few weeks ago. The first impression I got was the way the teachers introduced the lessons. They always started with a question and that had every student on their toes. As the lesson progressed a procedural […]

TEACHER AND THE MACHINE- Charity begins at home

Posted by on Nov 30, 2015 in KK | 3 Comments

The ability to learn a new skill and be able to retain it depends on a number of factors, among which, is the way the said skill is taught in the first place, which would then determine whether the skill is understood and the knowledge is grasped. This demands time. It’s just like learning to ride a […]

FREE EDUCATION, A SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

Posted by on Nov 16, 2015 in KK, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

The internet evolution and the ability to interact remotely with each other from all corners of the world could revolutionise the way we learn and teach. Imagine a classroom in a remote town in sub Saharan Africa, learning and experiencing the very same kind of education that students from the big affluent cities of this […]

Two Types of Mathematics

Posted by on Nov 3, 2015 in KK | 5 Comments

TASK 2 – TWO TYPES OF MATHEMATICS It seems there is an agreement among mathematicians, businesses and teachers alike that the way mathematics is taught in most schools is a bit short sighted and mostly driven by examination results. Just like Dan Meyer and Ken Robinson in Task 1, Richard Skemp, in Relational and Instrumental […]